Monthly Archives December 2013

“Where are the most precious pearls found- under the sea, hidden. Gold? Deep in mines. The best of things are hidden, so protect yourself.”

At the age of 11, when every Muslim around me was fasting, I was unable to be a part of this due to health issues. Depressed, I decided I wanted to do something else to please my lord, I knew that hijab was obligatory. However, as no one other in my family wore the hijab, it had never been something which I had thought I would do. Being only 11 when telling my family, they claimed I was too young, I would get bullied. But when I explained it would only be for a month, they agreed.

The hijab when I first put it on was difficult. People called me ugly, others stopped communicating with me.

Today, At the age of 20. I am still wearing a hijab. It never came off after that Ramadan. Hijab was the right choice for me. It defines me, it allows others to know I’m a Muslim – and when I am about to do something haram, the hijab serves as a reminder for me.

Now my sister is at the same stage as me, finding her way with the hijab. Hijab can’t be forced, it’s a choice and believe me the right choice. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Where are the most precious pearls found- under the sea, hidden. Gold? Deep in mines. The best of things are hidden, so protect yourself. Stay modest. May Allah give us all strength to follow his commands and grant us Jannah in sha Allah, ameen. Love you all for the sake of Allah SWT.

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“My aunts tried to convince me that we don’t wear hijab at parties, that we only need to wear it on the streets (eye roll.) I had gotten a new hair cut few days before the party and all of my dear aunts kept asking me, “why did you get this hair style if you want to cover it?”

Assalamualaikum.

I am an 18 year old girl from India. From the time I hit puberty, my clothes had short sleeves and I never bothered about covering my hair. I always thought that we should start wearing niqab or abaya when we are married or either close to getting married. But then I had to live in another state for 4 yrs for studies. Before, I had studied in my hometown in a Christian school. In my new school, I saw many girls wearing the headscarf. Some also wore abaya. I made new friends and coincidentally all of my friends wore the headscarf. Iseventh ally started wearing the hijab. I started wearing it but I did not cover my neck. Gradually, I started wearing it properly, neck covered and everything. Since then, I have not looked back, and In Sha Allah in next few days, I am going to buy my first abaya. I have worn the headscarf for approximately 4 yrs now but I have really understood it now.

I have attended two marriage parties with hijab after I came back, and of course I was stared at. Some girls younger than me passed comments in loud voices.

My aunts tried to convince me that we don’t wear hijab at parties, that we only need to wear it on the streets (eye roll.) I had gotten a new hair cut few days before the party and all of my dear aunts kept asking me, “why did you get this hair style if you want to cover it?”

People here have to learn a lot. What saddens me is the fact that even the muslims here give more priority to the so-called traditions even when it is completely against the islamic rules.

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“I’m not lucky. I don’t have her courage to stand up for myself. I don’t have her courage to represent myself. I am an introvert, I hide myself completely because I am that person who is so frightened of what people think of her. That is a bad thing to be. I am not lucky.”

Including me, my best friends are all Muslim and female. One like me, does not wear hijab but the other two do wear the scarf. We all have hobbies, and experiences and thoughts that many would call “straying from our deen” but we all accept each other with no judgement. All of us are also aware of our limits . Inner and outer, we all carry qualities and appearances that can be misunderstood as to what Islam actually is. I know I am making many claims here but here’s a story:

My Hijabi bff-let’s call her H, has received taunts from people about her hijab. Standing in line at a grocery store, someone told her, “I’m so sorry for your oppression”. She didn’t walk away. She turned around and basically, told him off.

Back in high school, an acquaintance of ours asked us if we were both Muslim. We both said yes. She then proceeded to ask why I do not wear the hijab and she does. We both agreed and said “It’s our own choices”. Despite saying that it was my best friends own choice, she looked to me and said “you’re lucky”.

Why?

No I’m not lucky. I don’t have her courage to stand up for myself. I don’t have her courage to represent myself. I am an introvert, I hide myself completely because I am that person who is so frightened of what people think of her. That is a bad thing to be. I am not lucky.

There are many reasons why I have not worn the hijab yet. I have thought about it, but it is up to me. Just like the other hijabi’s and niqabi’s. They know what they’re wearing.

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“I took off my hijab, and went to my first class with my carefully curled hair flying in the wind. People walked by me just like they normally did, and no one was extra friendly or overly nice to me. I sat in the back row, feeling devastated. I felt horrible inside, wishing I could run to the bathroom and cover my hair. Even though there were guys everywhere, I didn’t get the attention I had originally hoped for.”

I was born in America into a muslim family, and started wearing the hijab when I was ten. At the time, it wasn’t difficult. I went to a full time muslim school my whole life, so up until 12th grade I was always surrounded by muslim girls like me. I wore the hijab everywhere, but mostly because I was afraid of how my family would react if I stopped. My parents are very strict, and I was way more scared of them than Allah (swt)’s punishment. Also, I knew that if I took it off, all my friends and people I knew would be quick to judge. Not truly understanding the meaning and value of hijab, it was more a symbol saying “I am muslim” than a personal decision and commitment.
I got accepted into a college in a different state, where I knew no one. I still remember that first day, mostly because I was utterly miserable.

I took off my hijab, and went to my first class with my carefully curled hair flying in the wind. People walked by me just like they normally did, and no one was extra friendly or overly nice to me. I sat in the back row, feeling devastated. I felt horrible inside, wishing I could run to the bathroom and cover my hair. Even though there were guys everywhere, I didn’t get the attention I had originally hoped for.

And every time one of them saw my hair, I knew my bad deeds were piling up.
After class was over, hastened to put on my hijab. I had made a final decision, and realized the true meaning of hijab. No one knows of this story, not even my parents or best friend. This is the first time I am relating it. But I believe it was a great lesson for me, and I have vowed to never take off my hijab in public again.

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“So one day I decided just to go out covering my head. And I did. My parents did not take this lightly; they shouted and threatened me.”

I come from a Muslim family and live in a Muslim country. It might sound unusual but I had to struggle really hard to wear the Hijab. It is not usual for girls in a Muslim country to struggle to wear the hijab, as they are rather encouraged and respected for it, but my story was rather different. I come from one of those families where Hijab is looked down upon. Where the minimum of religious practices are practiced. I too was like that before but Allah granted me Hidaya and showed me the true light of Islam. Alhamdulillah. The society would have praised me too for wearing the Hijab but my family wouldn’t and I feared how I would start wearing it.

Telling my parents about wearing Hijab was one of the toughest things to do, where i knew the answer will be a straight no. But a friend of mine helped me to gather the courage to confront my parents. As i predicted they strictly prohibited me from wearing the Hijab. I could do nothing to make them understand that this is a command from Allah SWT. I continued to explain to them that this is the right thing to do, but all my efforts went down the drain. As rigid as I was to wear the Hijab they were too on not letting me wear it. At that time I was still not wearing the Hijab.

As I dug deeper into Islam I got to know that I didn’t have to have the consent of my parents to wear the Hijab. In Surah Luqman Ayah 31 Allah said that if our parents tell us to do something that would disobey Allah we must disobey our parents in that respect. So I questioned myself on what I was doing. I was obeying my parents and disobeying Allah. I feared my parents more than I feared Allah. I realized that this has to change. So one day I decided just to go out covering my head. And I did. My parents did not take this lightly and shouted and threatened me. But I was adamant. I wouldn’t disobey Allah anymore. So I ignored what my parents said and continued covering myself.

It has been seven months I am wearing the Hijab. Alhamdulillah. These seven months have been great. I felt so pure and so close to Allah. I felt so liberated. I heard lectures before that Hijab liberates but does not oppress. I really understood the meaning of it after wearing the Hijab. It was a great feeling. No feeling is greater than doing something to please Allah SWT.

My parent to this date doesn’t approve of my Hijab. I sometimes asked Allah that why He has given me parents like that? Why wasn’t I born in a family who would support me being religious? I was really upset thinking of it. Then I realized that Allah does everything for a reason and for the betterment of His slaves. I realized that if I had religious parents then maybe I wouldn’t have loved Islam so much. Since I would’ve gotten Islam at a cheap price I wouldn’t have understood its real price. Since I had to struggle to wear Hijab I understood its real value. I loved it even more. Since I had to fight to achieve it, it has become very precious to me.

I pray that my parents also understand how precious the Hijab is and I pray that Allah gives me the strength to keep holding to this precious pearl all through my life. Ameen.

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“A cab driver looked at me and called out “Hey sexy lady!” I went completely blank. What just happened? Wasn’t my loose clothes and no-make-up facing enough?”

I’m from Bangladesh. It’s a muslim country but let me give an idea how Islam is practiced here. We pray five times a day. We fast in the month of Ramadan. We eat halal meat. We start wearing burkha and growing beard when we’re 50+. So you get the idea.

So I was least bothered about this religion. I thought since I am a muslim, I will go to jannah anyway, may be after being punished a little- but I could handle that. I never hated this religion or hijab but I definitely wasn’t bothered. I was crazy, fun-loving, always making jokes, making people laugh, screaming at the top of my voice, trying to get attention, always dieting. I was typical.

Being a Muslim is like being a Bangladeshi, is what I thought. If I were born in India, I would be a Hindu. No biggie.

Then Allah The Most Merciful showed me a whole new different view of this religion through some amazing friends. So I started gaining more and more knowledge about deen. I started praying properly, started listening to lectures and reading Quran. All of this started around December, 2011. I stopped listening to music, stopped wearing western clothes, and started wearing loose clothes. Allah made it so easy. Then came Hijab! It was the month of May. I was walking to my home from somewhere. A cab driver looked at me and called out “Hey sexy lady!” I went completely blank. What just happened? Wasn’t my loose clothes and no-make-up facing enough?

After that, I started being truly modest. Not only modest in my appearance, but modest in my actions and the way I lived.

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“Everybody was like “You look so good, MashahAllah,” “Congratulations,”- I’ve never been that popular in my life. I didn’t get a single negative response that day. People I never even talked to before approached me to congratulate me.”

I remember my fist day clearly.

I’m a convert and have had some problems with my family that didn’t really accept it,so I looked for another place to live, after 5 months of searching, I finally found a place and couldn’t wait until I could finally put on what my creator had prescribed for me. The day had come. I moved.

I’m went into the college, and many didn’t know I was muslim, so when I finally walked through the school in jilbab and khimar, people were shocked.

Everybody was like “You look so good, MashahAllah,” “Congratulations,”- I’ve never been that popular in my life. I didn’t get a single negative response that day. People I never even talked to before approached me to congratulate me.

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“I have lost family and friends since I started wearing the hijab, but that hasn’t stopped me.”

I am a new hijabi and Muslimah. Since I’ve started wearing my hijab my life has changed for the better; I have gained a lot of respect from other Muslims. I feel so much more comfortable going out; I feel protected. People tried to tell me that I wasn’t ready to wear hijab and not to put it on, but I didn’t listen to them. I still put it on because I wanted the respect and to be a modest lady, to bring myself closer to Allah.
I have lost family and friends since I started wearing the hijab, but that hasn’t stopped me.

I am proud of my hijab and I’m proud to
be a Muslim. I can’t imagine my life without Islam or hijab.

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“Why are you even bothering, you’re barely Muslim.”

I am a muslim. Although I was raised in an Arab country, I never adapted to wearing the hijab. I was always confused, not sure as to believe that Allah truly existed, astaghfirullah, and although now I am more of a muslim than I was before, I still do not wear the hijab. However, I told myself that that was okay. It was better to love Allah from within yourself than from your parents telling you to. So I decided that bit by bit, I would learn more, try harder. But I would not allow myself to be a Myslim that was Muslim simply because of family. I decided that I would wear the Hijab every day of every Ramadan. And while this website may be of people wearing Hijab outside, I hope that this shows my perspective too.

When I decided to wear the hijab only once a year, other muslims mocked me. “You are not a real muslim, you only wear it on Ramadan.” or “True dedication is wearing it everyday.” or “You’re only wearing that because you think it’s a cute accessory.” Or the one I hated to hear, “Why are you even bothering, you’re barely Muslim.” I was shocked.

It wasn’t even as though I was walking around in shorts and a hijab, I was always dressed conservatively. It hurt me, for I was not accepted because of how I chose to wear the hijab. To me, my religion was between me and Allah, and not something that would be judged by others. So I did exactly what I wanted, even though it isolated me from other muslims. I wore my hijab in ramadan, and I went everywhere with it on. I got a few odd looks, but everyone in my community was supportive. Some even asked if I could tell them where I had gotten it from, and what the proper term was for it.

My experience with the Hijab is personal, and I understand that I will not be accepted by other muslims that deem themselves at a higher position because they wear a Hijab, but I love every moment in my hijab. My hijab makes me feel beautiful, and it makes me feel complete. I am not at the moment of complete dedication to it, but I hope to one day get there. And I hope to be an inspiration to those who are not fully dedicated, as in my eyes, it will feel better to wear the hijab when you feel as though you have found Allah rather than because your mother or father told you to.

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“Wearing hijab wasn’t difficult at all. The only problem them that I had was on the bus. This girl, who at the time I considered a friend, pulled my hijab off. It made me so upset but these are the type of people that need to be educated about the hijab.”

I am currently a senior in high school and I started wearing hijab in 6th grade, a year and a half before i had to. It was the beginning of the school year and I had switched schools so I told my mom that I wanted to wear hijab, that I wanted everyone to get to know me with a hijab. I also knew that it would make wearing hijab easier for me for when I had to.

Wearing hijab wasn’t difficult at all. The only problem them that I had was on the bus. This girl, who at the time I considered a friend, pulled my hijab off. It made me so upset but these are the type of people that need to be educated about the hijab.

The hijab isn’t just a piece of fabric that we wrap around out heads. The hijab defines us and our character.

Over the years I have come to appreciate the hijab even more. It makes me unique and I am always respected. I hope those of you who are questing whether to wear hijab or not, to wear it only if you are convinced. InshaAllah you make the best decisions.

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